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10FROM10 | Scottish Artists (Part 2)

Updated: Nov 30, 2020

On this blog post, both Tina and I have asked 10 Scottish Artists 10 questions each relating to their music and about their 2020. With the 10FROM10 blog series continuing to be a really interesting insight into the musicians who we feature, this new post with Scottish Artists will continue on with this new blog series, as we had always planned to expand beyond Twitch. Links to each of the featured Artists' social media and music websites are included below.


Fiona Liddell is a singer songwriter from Glasgow with a ten year music career performing with various bands and musical projects (Jack Hinks, Echo Arcadia, Loud Poets). This summer, she released a live album of original songs with her husband, Sam Thorne, on piano (‘The Lockdown Session’). This year, she released her first single, Graceless, as one half of electronic pop duo, Gefahrgeist, with producer Niall Rae (Aberdeen) whom she met at University while studying composition.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become a full-time musician?

I grew up in a music loving household. My parents were always playing female singer-songwriters' albums on long car journeys! They encouraged me to take violin lessons at school and my dad eventually taught me guitar. I started writing songs at age fourteen, posting them to YouTube and playing local talent shows/open mics. I actually won 'Search For A Star', which was a talent contest held in my home town with my terrible song 'Pentagon'! After leaving school, I studied Popular Music at Edinburgh Napier which further solidified my desire to become a musician full time. The people I met there (Niall especially) have remained invaluable contacts and collaborators for my music career. The skills gained at University (recording and producing, composition, business tools) gave me the perfect set up. I've been very lucky to have been a member of wedding band, 'The Apollos', for five years now which has been my main source of income (this year excluded!). I've also been a music tutor for three years teaching adults and kids violin and voice. It's such a rewarding job to introduce a skill you love to someone else and see how they progress with your guidance.


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

I feel that I'm in a very fortunate situation with Gefahrgeist as the majority of the music can be written and recorded from home, so lockdown has luckily not impacted our creative output too harshly! We've been working on our music for over two years now from home. Currently, I'm motivated by the response we've had to our debut single, 'Graceless', from people online. It's a great reassurance to have people share/review the song or engage in the music community as a whole! I also love discovering new music, so I've made sharing and supporting other artists a key part of Gefahrgeist's online presence. On my solo artist page (Fiona Liddell Music), I've actually started my own music review show called, 'Shoutout Saturdays', where I review and shout-out three new Scottish singles from the past month with the aim of offering some support to other musicians during this time and to bring their music to a new audience. My ultimate goal is just to create a more communicative and supportive music community where we listen to each other's releases and collaborate more. Why would someone listen to or share your song when you haven't listened or supported theirs? You hear the word 'competition' a lot, but it doesn't have to be like this! With gigs being cancelled, we need to come together and support each other's work during this time and I think that's my main motivation for this year.


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

Well, in a normal year we'd be spending every Saturday performing at weddings up and down the country, or at a number of Edinburgh's amazing venues. I really miss the feeling of being with a band onstage and being able to sing for a living. The fact that we're such a special part of a couple's big day is a big honour for me. Living without that has been tough, but the free time has allowed me to focus on releasing my original material. For instance, I doubt I would have found the time to release a live album without Covid-19! Before the pandemic, I was approached to play a live gig with a number of other artists based in Leith. Sadly, that couldn't take place so the organiser suggested that I put out a live-stream gig instead. Initially, I was very nervous as I hadn't performed any of my own material since I was about eighteen. My husband was happy to convince me of its merits, however. We spent weeks rehearsing and tweaking the songs with just piano (he's an amazing pianist) until I was happy to go ahead with it. The live-stream was a big success luckily, which encouraged me to release it as a live album a week later! It's called 'The Lockdown Session' and you can hear it on Spotify.


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

I think that every musician suffers from being too critical of their own work. I can certainly credit my anxiety to my lack of releases since graduating from University. I didn't think that anything I wrote was good enough to release for years, and focused instead on adding violin and backing vocals to other musicians' works. While I love being able to bring my skills to someone else's work and collaborate with other musicians, there was always a voice in the back of my head that I should be spearheading my own music as well. University was great for teaching me a lot of useful skills, but it also taught me how much better everyone else was at this than me. That's a hard thing to shake off! I have to credit my husband for supporting me and convincing me that my music was good enough to be heard. Even if everyone doesn't like it, it doesn't mean I have to give up and never release anything ever again! You can't please everyone, but you can strive to produce work that you're proud of. That's what I've changed my focus to now.


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

Yes, I have! The input and support from other musicians has been invaluable as I take my first tentative steps into releasing my own music. The advice of my previous collaborators like Jack Hinks has really helped me navigate how to promote and get the most of this debut release. Jack has been releasing music for the past eight years and we've worked together on almost all of his releases, so I learned a lot from watching him and asking for his advice. My playlist and review show has received nothing but positive responses from the musicians I 'shout-out' - which was the whole point! It's wonderful to create a platform for musicians to encourage each other and to bring their music to a wider audience. I remember one of the featured artists, Arkanna, getting in touch to say that they've had messages from people who found them because of the playlist. It's feedback like that which make it all worth it, because it means that it's working!


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

In this age of no live music and socialising, it's got to be digital! It took me a long time and a lot of research in order to find the right digital distributor for us. Everyone offers you a different thing; some charge for each release, some charge an annual fee, some offer pre-save campaigns, others don't. I chose Distrokid for several reasons - they allow you to run a pre-save campaign with a very sleek looking landing page with all your links and offer real-time statistics. There's an annual fee and you can release as often as you like, which is perfect for us as we slowly release tracks until our EP release next summer. I also want to mention Bandcamp, who've done an excellent job with their 'Bandcamp Fridays', when they remove their fee from music bought on their site and put the profit directly into the hands of the artists - most of whom are struggling financially due to the pandemic. In the future, we're entertaining the idea of an exclusive vinyl or CD release for the EP, but we'll see how it all goes!


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

They're mostly financial. With this release, I've slowly realised how much money you need to have in order to create a good buzz around your single with reviews, interviews, Spotify playlists etc. There seems to be a collective acceptance that music is free, but advertising isn't. Musicians aren't being paid enough by streaming services and as a result most of us don't see any financial returns from our releases. Yet we're expected to shell out most of our savings on reviews or blog posts. I completely sympathise with the fact that these reviewers and journalists need to be paid for their work and it's unfair to ask them to work for free. But shouldn't that be the same for the musicians? Without their creative output, what would they write about? And yes, you could argue that it's our choice to get into the industry and this is just something you have to do, but we need to have a serious look at the balance of money here and think up ways that musicians can make a feasible amount of money from their music so we can afford to promote it without breaking the bank.


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

Yes! As mentioned, my husband and I performed a live stream of eight original songs over the summer which we then released as an album. The response was incredible with the audience donating to our PayPal and picking up the album digitally via Bandcamp. Next year, Niall and I (Gefahrgeist) hope to put on a public performance of our music, but if that's not possible our backup plan is a live stream gig from one of Edinburgh's rehearsal rooms.


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

Don't be afraid to ask for advice from other musicians! We should be supporting and advising each other. Information isn't meant to be hoarded! If you have a connection or a tip, why not share it to your fellow artists? Imagine if you'd found a more efficient way to make a spreadsheet in your office job and you didn't tell anyone else about it. Then the only one who benefits is you! It's not a workable model for any other industry, so it shouldn't be the norm for us either. Also, listen to other people's music and tell them what you think. Share it if you like it! This creates a positive connection between you and the artists you love. Who knows? It might even open a dialogue where you can share advice with each other and collaborate. The worst thing that can happen is that you don't get a response. That's it!


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

We're hoping to finish off the rest of the EP at the start of the New Year (Covid willing). We want to record some live instruments for a couple of the tracks, so we might finally be back in a real studio! There are parts written for a string quarter and a small woodwind group. We've approached the musicians who seem keen, so now it's just working out the right place and whether or not the guidelines will allow it. After that, ideally we want to put on a live public performance at the end of the summer celebrating the return of live music to the city. We hope to include as many of our favourite Edinburgh artists as possible! Hopefully by the end of summer we'll be able to do this with audience social distancing in place. Towards the end of the year, we're hoping to release our second EP as well.


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Jen Athan is a singer-songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist from Aberdeen. Her self-defined 'Sad Girl Pop' genre blends her love of melody with unique and moody soundscapes. She currently lives near Glasgow and produces music out of her home studio. As well as focusing on her own music, she often writes and produces for other musicians as well as scoring music for films.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become a full-time musician?

It was something I always dreamed about doing from such a young age that I just

decided to pursue it after I left school. I was lucky that I had some great music

teachers in my life who encouraged me to pursue it as a career and that if I worked

hard enough at it I could make it my job.


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

I think just the escapism that music provides for me has always been my motivation

for continuing to pursue it through difficult times. I've had the opportunity this year to

explore my songwriting a little bit more and I've been lucky to meet and collaborate

with other writers online during the lockdown.


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

Obviously not being able to gig and go see live music has been a really hard thing

for myself and other musicians to process. However, I have definitely been trying to

keep positive and have been telling myself that this is a great opportunity to write

and score more music for projects I just didn't have time for in a world pre-Covid.


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

Honestly Covid might take the cake for this one. It's been really hard to be a

musician during these strange times and watching an industry that you love and are

a part of really struggle is something that has truly broken my heart this year.


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

I have indeed which I am so thankful for. I'm really lucky that the majority of my close

friends are in the music and creative arts industries and they're some of the most

supportive and encouraging people I know. We have this "we're all in this together"

attitude which is so incredible to be a part of. Whether we're helping each other out

with a project or promoting each others music on social media, it's nice to feel part of

community.


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

Definitely digital distribution. I've found it to be the best method for me at the moment

because it's very cost effective and enables people to listen no matter where they

are in the world. Also, I have a younger demographic who mostly use streaming

services to consume music so digital distribution was a no-brainer. I think it entirely

depends on your audience though and what they want to consume.


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

I think motivation is often quite hard. When you're writing and producing your own

music, managing yourself and doing your own PR it's very easy to get burnt out.


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

I have done a few gigs via live-stream. It's definitely different I'll say that. Instead of

getting nervous backstage I now find myself panicking half way through playing a

song in my bedroom wondering if my audio is working!


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

I think I would just say your emotions are valid. Whether you're angry, sad, stressed

or scared at the current state of our industry you have every right to feel like that.

These are such uncertain times for us all and I really believe we just need to band

together (no music pun intended) and help each other out.


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

Ooooh… I have a few things planned! I'm hoping to release a new EP in January and maybe

do something special for international women’s day in march - although I haven’t figured out

what yet. I'm really passionate about helping more women get into the production and the

business side of music so I'm hoping to work a bit more than that.


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Lisa Kowalski is a singer-songwriter from Paisley who has headlined Glasgow’s legendary King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, performed at New York Tartan Week and received a personal invitation from Dougie MacLean to perform at Perthshire Amber Festival. She has also gained airplay on BBC Radio and been praised as a songwriter by James Grant, Tom Odell, Fergal Sharkey and Imelda May.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become a full-time musician?

Music is just something I've always been very passionate about and felt very connected to! I'm the type of person who bottles up their emotions and isn't very good at talking about them, so being able to express myself and my feelings through music meant a lot to me and still does! It just gives me an outlet for dealing with things in my personal life and I like to think that listening to them could help people who relate! Whether it's written by me or other people, I connect to music and feel it very deeply and it's definitely something I couldn't live without. When I picked up my first guitar and learnt my first chords, it felt like I discovered that music is why I was brought to this universe.


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

Music always has and always will be my main motivator so as long as I have people to sing to (even if it's online), things to write about, music to listen to, I tend to stay motivated! If I find myself losing motivation, I find that meditation is very helpful. Over the course of lockdown, I've gotten into spirituality and that helped introduce me more to meditation! There's so many different videos with different intentions behind them and they make a huge difference.


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

In all honesty, it hasn't been great. I knew Covid would have an effect on the mental health of me and many others but it's been worse than I imagined. It feels like I've gone quite a few steps back in my mental journey and my musical journey since the start of lockdown - but the most important part is I'm trying to not beat myself up over it and understand that this is normal. Everyone's lives have been somewhat negatively impacted, and therefore their mindsets, and that's nothing to feel guilty or ashamed of. We just have to try our best to find healthy ways of dealing with it, focus on our goals and remain positive about life after all of this.


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

Recording/producing the vocals and some of the guitar on my single released earlier this year, "No More Time", was super challenging. It was my first experience in the studio by myself with no supervision, so it was very intimidating and I felt a lot of pressure to try and do it as perfectly as possible! It took, quite literally, a lot of blood, sweat and tears. But the end result and the feeling of knowing I'd accomplished something new was so worth it!


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

In some areas, yes, in other areas, not so much. But I'm so so grateful for all of the support, advice, encouragement and love I do get! I maybe don't get it as frequently or as much as a lot of other local musicians but that just makes everything mean so much more and makes it so special when a musician decides to support me back the way I support them!


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

Although I wasn't a big fan of Spotify at first due to the payment rates, I actually find it's the most beneficial form of uploading music! It's very useful as you can see updates about how many people are listening, where from, age range, etc., and playlists are a very good way of having your music discovered by new listeners!


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

To be honest, I think there may be too many to list, haha! It definitely isn't as easy as I thought it would be when I was 13. It's very competitive, it can make you feel insecure, lonely, used, untalented, worthless, anxious. But despite all that, I wouldn't give it up for the world. It has taught me a lot, made me a lot stronger and helped me realise that not everyone will like or understand both me or my creativity and that's okay. At the end of the day, I always try to remember that I didn't start writing or performing for money, approval, friends or anything other than the fact it makes me so genuinely happy and gives me a space where I feel I can be truly myself. All that I can do is be my authentic self, write authentic songs and hope it attracts authentic support!


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

I have - I've uploaded a couple of videos as well as doing live-streams and a couple of fundraiser live-streams! They don't quite compare to live gigs where you can make back and forth banter with the audience, thank everyone for coming and see their reactions as you perform but it's still a lovely way to keep in touch with everyone, play new music, etc.


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

Focus on yourself and your music. Every single person will be impacted differently by this and will feel different kind of emotions towards it. Some have been able to embrace it and turn it into a time of success and change. Some may have taken a few steps back and may feel very lost. And others may feel as if they're stuck on a straight line. Regardless, I think it's important not to compare yourself, your success, your music, etc. to anyone else at this time. You may feel as if you haven't accomplished enough during lockdown because others have accomplished more, but even just getting up and navigating your way through such an insanely foreign reality is an accomplishment. So whether you got out of bed or released a new song, remember to be proud of yourself and treat yourself with kindness. Don't feel obligated to do anything for anyone if it isn't for you.


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

It's quite hard to make plans at the moment with all the uncertainty for the future! My plans are to release some new music that will be quite experimental/different for me but I'm super excited about that! If things are safe, I'll be returning to New York for New York Tartan Week! Hopefully some gigs will be lined up too but only time will tell!


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Singer-songwriter Neev has a voice that stays with you - warm and husky, whilst also curious and delicate. Combined, this creates an intimate sound somewhere between Rachel Sermanni and Lianne La Havas. While her lyrics set out on broad themes - relationships, existential angst, quarter-life crises - Neev has a remarkable knack for discovering beauty in the small details. Her first single, Burning To Dust, was released in 2019 as a vocally focused acoustic arrangement with violin.


Originally from Glasgow, Neev is the latest Scottish songwriter charming crowds in London - a place where nobody can pronounce her real name, Niamh. Hence, 'Neev' was born.


2020 has been an exciting and productive year to date for the Scottish singer-songwriter. Her new track, Excuse Me, follows the well-received Forgiving Light and Black Over Grey as Neev's fourth 2020 release and final track to make up her debut EP titled Forgiving Light.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become a full-time musician?

Other musicians! I love the musical community you find at gigs and communities, especially because I live in London. You just find yourself becoming so inspired by other creators and performers. It really compels the ways in which I write and perform.


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

Good question! Live music is such a big thing for me so finding inspiration has been much more remote. Hearing what my friends are recording and releasing and really getting into the recording process myself has been a good experience. I don't think I would've ever found the time to really learn the process of recording and production without being stuck at home, so that's a bright side I guess. Although I'm itching to get back to seeing live music regularly and performing. 


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

I think I probably spend less time overall doing music but the music time I do spend now is much more... concentrated and considered? Because to do music stuff at the moment is to record, arrange, produce - all of those things take so much practice and attention that you really need to be in the zone. Whereas, before COVID I could be performing up to three times a week which would take up so much of my time and be so much fun but maybe require my consideration in a different way?


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

Big question! I think just remaining confident in what I'm doing and the decisions I'm making. I think there's no right answer for anything in this industry and your path can differ from one musician to the next and so on that remaining confident in the decisions your making is probably the most challenging thing. 


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

No question! I don't think I'd still be doing this if it weren't for the musicians I've learned from, played for and collaborated with. They're a constant driver and inspiration and it's a big push for me to keep going. I love working on other projects for that reason, you can continue to build on your skills as a musician and song-writer with a bit of detachment and distance.


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

Probably Spotify as a platform - it's very user friendly and allows for you to track how and where your music performs well. I think knowledge on how to do well on Spotify is more common place than with other music platforms. Also, as a listener, I really like using it. Although I don't condone the pennies artists receive per stream.


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

I think just obtaining the right knowledge from the right places was the biggest challenge - I wish I was less afraid of asking questions and doing the research and taking ownership of my path from the beginning. There's so many ways of doing things in this industry, so I think the biggest challenge was knowing who to take advice from and how to make my own decisions. I still think I've got a long way to go but I think I've got a better idea of who and where to turn to at certain stages.


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

Yes and no - I did a few to begin with but I just miss the live environment so much, you just can't beat it!


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

I think that everyone is quick to say there's 'no live gigs' at the moment and live music is dead, but there is an avenue out of this and I've attended and performed some socially distanced, safe gigs this year and I believe there will be an end to it! My advice would be: support the survival of live music as soon as you can. 


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

I have so many plans! I'm just working on the execution at the moment. There's been a lot of writing and recording so that will continue and take shape early next year I think - so new music to come! But I also really want to work on video material, I haven't done enough of that so expect some more video action shortly. :) 


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Post Coal Prom Queen are Lily Higham and Gordon Johnstone - the songwriting duo behind the band L-space and their three critically acclaimed albums; Kipple Arcadia (2018), Music for Megastructures (2019), and Feed The Engines! (2020). Their songs have been heard on BBC Radio 1, 6Music, and BBC Radio Scotland and have garnered international acclaim. Having cut their teeth with L-space, Lily and Gordon have developed a unique sound for PCPQ by blending organic textures, retrofuturistic synths, and mechanical beats with ambitious pop sensibilities - fused together with Lily's distinct vocals. After joining the small Tokyo-based label Kiishi Bros. Entertainment the band released several popular collaborations with the Japanese alt-pop innovators, macaroom, giving them a solid international fanbase. January 2021 will see PCPQ work with unique festivals, release their debut EP and album, and reschedule their tour dates for the UK, Japan and Canada. Their sound has been likened to M83, Goldfrapp, Boards of Canada, Gorillaz, and Portishead.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become full-time musicians?

Gordon: Neither Lily nor I are full time musicians - we balance our creative lives with our respective careers. We're deeply passionate about our music and we love every second of it, but we're realistic about how the world works. Making a full time career from music is nigh-on impossible and we also love what we do professionally, so we've got the best of both worlds.


Lily: I am interested in a lot of things, so I have my money-making job in the tech industry, which has helped so much with staying stable in a time when the music industry is in a lot of trouble. I like having two careers!


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

Gordon: I don't think my motivations have changed much this year - I still make music because I love it - but this year has taken a lot of the pressure off of us. We don't feel like we need to try to 'keep up' with our peers by playing the trendiest festivals, we're not under tight deadlines for releases, there's less compromise in our music now, and so on. The world coming screeching to a halt has given us the chance to take a step back and figure out what we want to do and how we want to do it, which has made us much happier and has allowed us to make the music I've always known we're capable of.


Lily: Music helps a lot of people through hard times. I don't know if it is true, but I like to think that putting out music could bring something nice into people's lives when they are otherwise having a hard time. I am still motivated by music. I also keep looking forward and aiming for the future when we can go on tour. I know it is better not to live in the future, especially when things are so uncertain, so I try not to spend too much time daydreaming and think of things to work on in the present! I am enjoying spending more time reading sci-fi and speculative fiction, motivating me to write songs about interesting ideas and a better future.


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

Gordon: For me it isn't too bad - I've been able to write quite a lot of music and we've squeezed in some studio time to record the EP. It has been nice taking a break from playing gigs, although we were devastated that our shows in London and Tokyo were cancelled back in April. We're looking forward to rescheduling them for 2021 (we hope). It has slowed the progress of our upcoming EP a bit as well.

Lily: I have found it a lot harder to work on music as my environment isn't ideal for it. I think some people manage to get inspiration from stressful situations and use it to write songs. I write better when relaxed and this Covid situation is quite...unrelaxing. I write in an initially improvisational way and feeling unrestrained and open helps with being more inventive. I need some more physical and mental space, and the trapped feeling stops me feeling as unrestrained and open.


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

Gordon: The complete ambivalence that your music is met with, more often than not. We're lucky that we've had quite a lot of people say nice things about our records and listen to our music, but sometimes you put something out there that you've put your heart and soul into and the world goes "eh, so what?". That's a pretty tough pill to swallow. I think every musician comes to the realisation at some point or another that if you don't make easily accessible music then you're facing an uphill struggle, but ultimately it's one worth climbing.


Lily: I agree with Gordon. We have had many financial and practical challenges, but the ones that never leave you are the mental challenges. A main motivation for making music, apart from it being fun, is to put something out into the world that can bring something positive into people's lives. If you don't hear back about that positive impact being real, it can feel like your mission has failed and you doubt your ability. When you do hear that even a few people have got something from your music, it energises you, and you have to hold onto that to keep you going. I have learned from this challenge how important it is to encourage other musicians (or people working on any kind of project), as I think this is a common experience.


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

Gordon: The Scottish scene, like any music scene, has its cliques and cabals that are impossible to penetrate and tend to monopolise a lot of the opportunities and exposure. We're very lucky that we've got some close musical friends who support us and who we support - it makes the whole thing infinitely better to be a part of.


Lily: We have had some, and we really value it. When you support and encourage each other, that is one of the best parts of music community. It's good to focus on these people in your life, not just in the music field.


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

Gordon: It depends how you measure success. The first L-space record came out on vinyl and looked lovely, but the problem with physical releases is that people listen to them at home and you never really hear about their experience of it, whether they enjoyed it or not, or they don't tell other people about it to spread the word. Whereas our most recent songs have found themselves on fairly big playlists and we can see from the analytics that we've reached tens of thousands of people - more than L-space ever did. So I suppose it depends on what you want as a musician. For us we'd rather if more people heard our music, so the latter works well for us.

Lily: We have some ideas for new methods of distributing music that we haven't tried before, from realising the value of word of mouth (including digital communication) recommendations. We are seeing it as a kind of experiment. Get back to us in a year and we will present our experiment results! Even if it doesn't work, experiments are fun and we will learn from it.


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

Gordon: All of them. I think our biggest challenge has been our lack of experience. When you look at a lot of bands doing well right now in Scotland, this isn't their first attempt at a music career. Most of them have been in bands for decades and built up experience, equipment, contacts, etc. When we started we had, quite literally, no idea what we were doing. I didn't even know how to set the metronome on Garageband when we recorded our first songs in my flat back in 2016/2017. We've learned, grown and evolved very publicly while putting music out - we've worn our inexperience on our sleeves. I wouldn't have it any other way - I find it incredibly boring when bands emerge from nowhere with 10 ultra-polished songs that they churn out at every gig.


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

Gordon: We did a streamed show for Hidden Door, which was a lot of fun, but we haven't done any others as we've taken the time over lockdown to write and work on the EP/album.


Lily: I am quite worried about doing live streamed performances. Getting them right, for example with the right balance of sound, seems like a complex new skill I haven't put the time to work on. It is also difficult for us to rehearse with advice not to travel, so I don't feel rehearsed enough to perform. We do try to keep fans updated with behind-the-scenes looks of what we are working on though.


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

Gordon: Don't vote Tory.


Lily: I don't know what practical advice I can give that you don't already know, but I do want to say to remember you are very valuable to many people and to our culture.


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

Gordon: We have an EP ready to release early in the new year and we'll hopefully reschedule our shows in Japan. We're also working with Hidden Door on some really exciting projects that we can't wait to announce.


Lily: Lots more song creation! For our own records, and also more collaborations. We really enjoyed collaborating with the band, macaroom, and see a lot of value in working with other artists, so we will continue doing that too. I plan to read more, and use this as inspiration for lyrical topics I haven't explored yet. I want to improve my music production skills, as there are so many techniques I don't even know about yet.

Also a secret, ssshhh...


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Influenced by the likes of Twenty One Pilots and new wave pop, Silvi embraces a style of music which breaks down boundaries of what Pop, Indie, Rap or Soul ‘should’ sound like. A duo from West Lothian in Scotland, combining Jodi’s soulful unique voice, with Cameron’s creative interpretation of melody, they arrive at their innovative adaptation of music. With powerful, captivating lyrics, and combined genres, their music gives the listener something new, fresh, and creative to enjoy.


Their first single, Your Smoke, was released on 28th August.


Their second single, That’s Not Love, was released on Friday 23rd October and will be followed by an accompanying video at the end of November.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become full-time musicians?

Jodi: As a child music would affect me and make me feel emotions that I hadn’t experienced in real life yet which is where I learned it was so powerful. It was always something I loved and I don’t think I’ve ever gone a day without singing but it wasn’t until my late teens I realised I’d love to do it full time as opposed to just as a hobby.


Cameron: My dad is a musician so from a young age I’ve always been around instruments, just naturally wanted to play myself.


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

Jodi: I’ve realised now more than ever just how important the arts industry is to almost everyone to some extent. Some people heavily rely on it every minute of the day and then others turn to it momentarily in their happiest or darkest moments, and I think it needs to be available for everyone to do that and subsequently, the people creating it need to be supported.

Cameron: I really enjoy doing everything to do with music so I don’t really need any motivation as such, not really much more to say...


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

Jodi: We agreed to start a band just before lockdown and so the entire development period has been during lockdown and it’s different variation of restrictions. At first we we’re having zoom calls to discuss ideas or I’d write a song in my room and send a low quality recording of it to Cammy who’d have a play about with it on guitar in his room. Then, when we were allowed in gardens, we had a few jams which is where it finally had room to breathe and we could properly collaborate. In between lockdown 1 and 2 we managed to release 2 songs and the biggest impact on us during that time was not being able to gig our new material and build a live presence off the back of our debut and follow up release. We often chat about what venues we could’ve played / who we could’ve supported by now if gigs had been on this year.


Cameron: Like Jodi was saying we only started SILVI when lockdown hit, it was the excuse we needed to actually make it happen so if it weren’t for Covid we might not have done it!


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

Jodi: For me, back in 2019 I was gigging whilst I was going through a difficult time with family illness and bereavement and that was where I had to step back and take a break for a while. It was extremely difficult to leave music on the back burner for a few months and I couldn’t be happier to have it back now.


Cameron: Probably right now not being able to gig, it’s rubbish but hopefully it won't be long until we’re back.


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

Jodi: I personally have had really positive experiences with other musicians. I think there’s a preconception that female musicians would be super competitive with each other but so far every other girl / non binary artist I’ve met in person or interacted with on social media has been top class. It’s been really nice to have the support of the more successful bands in our local area too, it’s mainly guys our age and a bit older and they’ve been nothing but brilliant with us.


Cameron: I feel like the West Lothian music scene is a very supportive place to be in, everyone kind of helps each other out.


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

Jodi: Probably just social media promotion at this point as we’ve not had the chance to promote in any other way through appearing live at gigs or networking in person. It’ll be interesting when gigs are back to see how much it impacts our stats.


Cameron: Can’t disagree with Jodi there.


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

Jodi: Probably the most challenging thing for me is having to work a full time job along side doing gigs. For a while I was working and commuting an hour there and an hour back on top of doing 2/3 gigs a week and that proved to be physically and mentally exhausting. I don’t think I’ll ever agree to that many gigs a week again unless it’s my job.


Cameron: Again just the same as Jodi there, having a full time job can be a bit challenging.


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

Jodi: Our only performances so far have been via social media, our debut gig was for “live in livi” at Sweetdram back in July - that was a socially distanced all day live stream. It was amazing! Then on the 28th of November we’ll put out a pre-recorded gig of us performing with our full set for the virtual wee G (Gig in the Goil).

Cameron: We’ve also done a couple of pre-recorded live videos for Facebook and YouTube.


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

Jodi: I’d give the same advice I’d give to anyone at the moment, stay hopeful and know that this isn’t forever.


Cameron: Jodi couldn’t have put it any better.


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

Jodi: We’d love to get a few proper in-person live gigs under our belt. We haven’t had a massive amount of practice or experience doing our full set up but we’re ready to jump into gigging and find our feet through trial and error.


Cameron: Festivals are my favourite kind of gigs so hopefully get a few festivals under our belt.


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Slow Weather is the new project from renowned producer and Catholic Action frontman Chris McCrory and singer-songwriter Annie Booth. Annie and Chris first met when Annie was providing feature vocals on a Wojtek the Bear track. A big fan of his recording style, Annie then went into the studio with Chris to work on her Spectral EP. The process was extremely fun and organic, leading to talk of writing together for a new project.


After they penned their first song together in four hours, the two knew they'd stumbled across something exciting. The Clean Living EP, due for release in November 2020, was recorded mainly at Hermitage Works Studios in London, with the finishing touches added at Chris' home.


Preceded by two digital singles, the EP brings you well-executed, lush songwriting from two people whose individual crafts have seamlessly woven together to produce music that is utterly lovely in its sound and has depth in its meaning.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become full-time musicians?

Annie: Was never really a plan - it was just something I was attracted to because of the fun and creativity of it. There was always good music playing in my house, and listening to and playing music was a wonderful escape for me.


Chris: It wasn't a plan for me either so much - it wasn't a conscious thing. I was just always drawn to writing songs, playing in bands and then a little later recording other people. I worked hard at that and got really lucky in that now it's my full time job.


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

Annie: Sometimes it’s very difficult to feel motivated, but remembering there’s still a lot to be grateful for helps.


Chris: The older I get the more I realise that if I don't make things I wither. If I'm ever not feeling great and I make something, it always makes me feel better. It's black and white and really obvious to me now, but it wasn't always so. It's like scratching an itch I forgot I had.


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

Annie: All gigs are gone obviously but it’s great to still be able to record for my solo stuff, and prepare for future releases. Lots of time to think and reflect. Happy to have been able to release the Slow Weather record at this time.


Chris: I've tried to just take this year as it comes and enjoy it for what it is as much as possible. My band had to cut short a US tour and come home on the last flights out in March which wasn't ideal. But I honestly think I was in desperate need of a break and to shake things up in my life. I've been very lucky in that I've still been able to work remotely, mixing projects for folk in my home studio and have been back working in other studios since July. It's also given me a chance to really re-prioritise and also, to write a solo album that I've been dying to do for years.


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

Annie: Accepting that a lot of 'cool' musician behaviours don’t come naturally to me..!


Chris: I find it challenging to be enthusiastic about anything other than the pure act of writing, recording or playing live. I'm very cynical and sceptical about social media and the wider music industry, so I find it hard to interface with it in a meaningful or sustained way. I'm not an entrepreneur, I'm a songwriter and a producer.


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

Annie: Definitely - supporting other acts and vice-versa is often a very encouraging activity. Playing with a band called Mt. Doubt did a lot for my craft and musicianship, as did performing with musicians back when I was at uni.


Chris: Music thrives on support and collaboration on every level. From writing together, listening to your friends or local bands or organising tours. I wouldn't be doing what I'm doing were it not for the folk in music that I've met and looked out for and vice versa.


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

Annie: We work with an awesome label called Last Night From Glasgow who distribute our music to a wide variety of listeners and contacts. They operate a fan subscription service for releases and press much of the music onto 12” vinyl.

Chris: Small runs of well crafted vinyl and digital is the way to go right now.


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

Annie: Insecurity and uncertainty of the future. And knowing that pre-Covid a lot of my income streams were seasonal/ebbing and flowing.

Chris: Remaining motivated in the face of grinding, relentless indifference. There are lots of things you can do with your time that are easier than being in a band. However, there are fewer things more rewarding in life than truly expressing yourself. Chase your truth - pay the rent. Strike a balance and run with it as far as you can.


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

Annie: I understand the appeal but have only done one live stream myself. I empathise with musicians who are missing that sense of connection with their audiences.

Chris: ❌❌❌


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

Annie: Be kind to yourself. Try and preserve integrity always.


Chris: Really ask yourself why you're doing what you're doing. Make art for a purpose other than "making it" and it'll sustain you. It's about meaningful, creative expression, not followers. I feel like recently a lot of people have forgotten that.


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

Annie: Potentially writing more, trying to keep busy - and attempting to face 2021 without an overwhelming sense of dread 🙂

Chris: I want to get married and start a large family as soon as possible.


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Hamilton-raised singer-songwriter Stephanie Cheape is a former winner of Capital FM's Best Unsigned Act, having blown away a panel of judges and wowed the Scottish music industry at the SSE Scottish Music awards for Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy.


Stephanie has performed at festivals including TRNSMT, Belladrum and Party At The Palace. She headlined the legendary King Tut’s in Glasgow and supported the likes of Bryan Ferry in front of thousands at Glasgow’s iconic Kelvingrove Bandstand at Regular’s Summer Nights, where the Roxy Music legend said on stage, he was blown away by her performance.


There was also the small matter of headlining Edinburgh’s Torchlight Procession to 25,000 screaming fans and then playing the world-famous Street Party at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay the following evening.


On November 28th, Stephanie will be performing alongside Lewis Capaldi, Biffy Clyro, Texas, Amy Macdonald and Wet Wet Wet at the Scottish Music Awards raising funds for the Nordoff Robbins music therapy charity. More details about the event and the charity and fund raising can be found here : www.nordoff-robbins.org.uk/smas2020


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become a full-time musician?

I was a bit of a mouse in school and almost wanted to be invisible. When I connected with music properly, I found it empowered me in a way that made me feel stronger and like nothing else mattered. An escape from day to day bullshit, essentially. Hard-Fi was probably the first real band I connected with. I was obsessed with the reality of their songs, then Lily Allen came along and I saw she was singing about ugly truths… I wanted to say what I felt through music and those artists showed me how.


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

My motivation hasn’t really changed - if I’m being absolutely honest the music industry has always been tough. To survive it you need to be patient. This is just the classic waiting game. So I’m just as motivated now as I have been through every challenge it's thrown at me.


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

The impact on my career is certainly difficult but it's allowed me to readjust some things in my life that will help me write better. You know it's tough, I think we all feel the sense of frustration, sadness for what we can no longer do with ease but I just want to keep grounded and thankful for what I do have and when we're through this I can truly appreciate those little things.


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

I think just the isolation of it all. I was always with so many people previously and I’ve had to learn how to produce myself, to set up things which I didn’t really understand as well before - it's helped me up skill myself as a musician.


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

I have had so much support from other musicians. I feel this has actually brought artists together. I’ve certainly lucked out when it comes to friends in the industry.


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

I guess I’ve always released digitally. Spotify is obviously the daddy currently but it can be a difficult one to master - i’m still learning! I’ll let you know when I know.


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

I have an incredible team who support me and help me through every situation. As a female in the industry I only work with people who treat me as an equal and or tell me straight. The biggest lesson I’ve learned is to not waste your time. Sometimes things just don’t fit and it's far better to be upfront - if something isn’t working for me, I let people know where I’m at and thank them for their time. I think honestly is far better than wasted time.


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

Yes, I have and more so at the start of lockdown. I think I love connecting with the real life thing too much to fully appreciate the online gig but I will revisit It again.


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

I suppose we are all winging it at the moment. I’m not an expert by any means but I suppose the best advice is build yourself a solid team for a comeback.


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

I plan to release, tour, surprise and dance. Not necessarily in that order.


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Scottish Pop duo The Eves are Caroline Gilmour and Marissa Keltie. Previously solo artists, their explosion onto the music scene as a combined force in 2018 has established them as one of the UK’s most promising and exciting songwriting duos.


Their most recent single, Love Will Find You (LWFY), which was released on 14th August, is a song for today’s world - it evokes a universal sense of embracing human kindness when times are hard. No matter how tough and desperate things can get, love is out there – and it will find you.


Their four previous singles produced by Mark Morrow (Vistas, False Friends) have had radio play by BBC Regionals, Talk Radio and Union Jack Radio, firmly establishing them as an act to follow.


2020, though a challenge with Covid-19, is not stopping the duo from forging ahead. They are currently writing and recording new music with former Prides drummer and producer Lewis Gardiner (Ellie Goulding, Nick Jonas). They were also chosen by Levi’s to appear on their ‘Stay Home, Stay Connected’ Covid-19 online campaign, performing to a global reach of 26 million Levi’s followers.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become full-time musicians?

Marissa: Probably for me it would be Alicia Keys. I played classical Piano and sang and up until Alicia came out, I hadn't really seen anyone like that. It made me see things differently and I instantly wanted to be her!


Caroline: For me, it was studying music and playing instruments at High School, combined with a love of listening to music. Alanis Morissette's debut album, Jagged Little Pill, made a huge impression on me and from that point on I started writing my own music and lyrics.


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

We don't want to stand still! The pandemic has made us even more determined to try as hard as we can to succeed in what is already a notoriously difficult industry. Now with budget cuts and a lot of areas within the music industry on hold, we have to try even harder than before. 


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

It has been harder to stay inspired and come up with new ideas. Life can be a bit mundane - looking at the same four walls doesn't give us much to feel excited about! But in saying that, we made the decision to stay focused and productive to get us through Covid. We have been working remotely with producer Lewis Gardiner, and have completed 10 new tracks so we are pretty happy with that.


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

It's hard to make a living as original songwriters. There really is no money to be made until you reach a certain level so you end up having to juggle other jobs but also still have to find time to write, record and perform. Not to mention manage all of your own promotion, social media and music admin. It's a real challenge - there are never enough hours in the day and we're often left feeling pretty exhausted at the end of each week.


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

Absolutely. Over the years we've both gigged with numerous musicians - it's a great community. It's humbling when you find people who are willing to be part of your musical journey and learn how to play the music for your own original songs. There's a lot of support online as well. It's important that we all stick together and take care of each other.


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

We use digital distributer Emubands. They distribute our new music to all the major digital sites like Apple Music, Amazon, Spotify, etc. So it's nice and easy for digital, albeit the streaming revenue model is abysmal. We haven't released any physical products yet but plan to in the future. 


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

The main challenge is of course financial. It costs a lot of money to devote your life to creating music - recording, production and mastering costs, videos, photography, promotion and radio plugging run into the thousands for each campaign you do. That's why, if you're independent, you have to take on another form of employment to be able to fund it all, as the returns from performing and digital sales/streaming are not enough to cover these costs. The other challenge is time. Juggling all of the above leaves little time for anything else and can often lead to burnout. There are many times where we ask ourselves, 'why are we doing this?' - but music is in our blood. It's our passion and reason for being, so we don't feel like we have a choice.


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

We have done a handful of online performances, including one for Levi's. We try to be selective about what we do so that it doesn't get too samey for people watching. It's been a great tool to be able to have online gigs as we wouldn't have done any performing otherwise! 


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

Just keep going! It can be really hard to find inspiration but don't give yourself a hard time if you don't feel as inspired as you would normally. Life is a bit mundane and routine just now, so we're not getting the same experiences to write about. Watching live performances of artists you love can help get you fired up again. Reading books is another avenue to start thinking about lyrics. We also find that staying active and being out in nature helps to feed the mind, body and soul.


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

A lot of our plans are really going to be reliant on how quickly the music industry can recover from Covid, however we are planning to write new music, explore some collaborations, and hopefully release a few more singles to keep building momentum.


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VUKOVI are a 2-piece alternative rock band from Ayrshire, Scotland made up of vocalist Janine Shilstone and guitarist Hamish Reilly. They have released 2 full length albums to date with the latest record, Fall Batter, appearing in January 2020 and debuting at number 1 on the Official Charts Rock & Metal Albums (alongside a sold-out UK headline run on launch week). The band have built up a very dedicated fanbase through extensive touring in the UK and Europe over the past couple of years, playing slots at the likes of TITP, TRNSMT, Slam Dunk, Reading and Leeds, 2000 Trees, Truck/Y Not Festival and The Kerrang Tour, plus supports with the likes of PVRIS, Set It Off, One Ok Rock and Grouplove.


The band are currently working on album 3 and released their latest single, SLO, on 2nd November.


1. What was it that got you into or inspired you to become full-time musicians?

Hamish: It's actually hard to say exactly what happened there, haha! All I remember was being like 12 and air-guitaring all the time to Nirvana's Nevermind, RCHP's albums and Limp Bizkit, and the next thing I recall was being in a guitar shop with my dad trying some starter pack guitars out, and I swear to god the rest is history. As of 13 I've just never stopped playing. Always loved music since a young age and to be honest I have my supportive as f**k parents to thank for that!


2. With the events of this year being very different now, what motivates you currently?

Hamish: I think the thing about being a musician or in a band or whatever is that you never really turn off. You kinda feel like you can't. The constant need for new music is always there, so that combined with our fanbase and just our want to keep releasing new music has kept us going through these months! I think focusing on what playing these new songs like when live music is PROPERLY back is a big driving factor for us too.


3. What impact has the current situation with Covid-19 had on your music / life balance?

Hamish: Well, its absolutely flipped my sleeping pattern, haha. I mean I've always been pretty nocturnal, but like holy shit I'm talking about not going to bed until like 7.30/8am most days now - depends! I'll be completely honest here, I initially just played COD Warzone, every day, all day. Like soooo addicted. But as time has gone on I've been able to adjust and refocus on the band/writing and working on how we are gonna take things forward, which feels great. Plus improving my Twitch channel, which ironically without Covid and lockdown I'm not sure if I would have ever got round to starting!


4. What has been your most challenging experience, music or in general, to date?

Hamish: Musically... probably trying to balance a part time job and the band and relationships, etc. I've always found that difficult and probably not been very good at it as I get obsessed with doing VUKOVI stuff quite often! There was a point in the summer of last year (2019) where we had been on tour for 6 weeks, and I got back the next day from the end of tour and went right back into my part time retail job like nothing had happened, and it just kinda hit me at that point that I couldn't do this like I had been for years anymore and I quit a few weeks later. I think I'd have literally lost my mind had I continued in that pattern, haha, so was mainly a mental health move. But yeah, that was quite a tough time!


5. Have you found or had much support and encouragement from other musicians?

Hamish: So, what's interesting is... I'd say more so during Covid/lockdown than ever! Which is so cool and needed in this industry! I've gotten to know so many more bands and musicians that I admire throughout this just from Twitter/Instagram/Twitch etc. I think that has maybe just come from everyone being in the same boat here, making it easier to connect with others than ever before, at least I've felt that anyway!


6. Which method of distributing music have you found to be the most effective?

Hamish: We've tried all ways by now, haha. Self-released. Indie label. Self-released through a music services label and back to self-released again. They all have their pros and cons. For us if it hadn't been for having some label involvement we would have never had the budgets for the marketing and PR campaigns we've had so that has been amazing plus, the help in building your contact base. Going forward we might self-release a few more songs to provide us with some streaming income that is 100% ours, but for releasing an album we'd like to be a on a label again for the support they can provide!


7. What challenges have you faced as an independent musician?

Hamish: Basically, they are all financial challenges and juggling budgets, etc. It pretty much all comes down to money, haha. But we have been a band long enough now and have enough releases (plus more soon) that it is kinda now starting to pay off. But it has taken us like 11 years to get there, haha!


8. With live gigs being impacted this year, have you used social media for live performances?

Hamish: You know what we haven't massively! We've done 2 "internet festivals" where we just all recorded and filmed our parts from home then I'd edit it all together like a live set, which has been fun as hell! But that's it really. We've never really been fans of doing acoustic stuff, so there probably won't be any Instagram live acoustic sets from us, haha. Although we've been tempted to film a proper live set and film it in a nice location etc. We'll see!


9. Is there any advice that you would give to other musicians during these uncertain times?

Hamish: It's so hard to say, it really depends on the person and their mentality. Like this would seem like great time to write and improve your craft etc.....but I've actually found that quite hard. Like we've written a few songs and I really like them all, but it's not been this like HUGGEEE creative outlet kinda thing! It's been creative, but at a slower pace, which honestly has been kinda nice for us. Bit less stressful. My advice would be... just look after yourself. Don't feel the pressures of "I MUST USE THIS TIME TO WRITE AND IMPROVE", as I find that completely unnecessary and mentally dangerous at the moment.


10. Looking ahead, what are your future plans going into the New Year and beyond?

Hamish: We have a few things we are working on! We have done some stuff with Amazon Music which will be out very soon, and then we plan to release a few more singles after the New Year... and by then hopefully we'll know if we can play festivals or not! FINGERS CROSSED.


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Tina and I would both like to say a huge thank you to each of the Scottish Artists: Fiona, Jen, Lisa, Niamh, Gordon & Lily, Jodi & Cameron, Annie & Chris, Marissa & Caroline, and Janine & Hamish for being a part of this blog post and for taking the time to answer our questions and allowing us to share their replies. We hope to continue this blog series even more over the coming months so please keep checking back for our updates in the future.

Please click on the image below to check out all the other posts in this amazing blog series...


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